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timeline 6-10

March 25, 2008

Age 6 – I enter kindergarten, a magical place of reading corners, indoor sandboxes, play kitchens and lots of penguin decorations.

Age 7 – On a family vacation to New York City, we visit the Statue of Liberty. I am incredibly excited to climb up to the top and look out through her crown. My dreams are crushed when I realize I must stay down at the base with my younger brother and my mom. I am so mad I refuse to turn around for my mother to take a picture of Jonathan and I. Afterwards I immediately regret it, sure that I have lost my one chance in life to have a picture taken in front of the Statue of Liberty.

Age 8 – This marks the official last year of adorable little Abigail because at the beginning of second grade I get glasses. Glasses alone would not be enough to end the cuteness, but when combined with my homemade vests, side ponytails and a rolly polly figure I enter the long dark tunnel of awkwardness.

Age 9 – Most of this year is spent in our basement playing Legos with my brothers and listening to my dad’s copy of Simon & Garfunkel’s The Concert in Central Park on vinyl record.

Age 10 – Our family packs all our belongings into a yellow Ryder truck.  After saying goodbye to all 36 of my first cousins, 24 aunts and uncles (just on my mom’s side) and assorted best friends, We drive west across Pennsylvania, all the way across Ohio and about halfway across Indiana to the town of Goshen.  We move into a light blue house in the back end of a suburb near the train tracks.  I am thrilled about all of it right up until I realize that I know longer know anyone or have any best friends in a 100 mile radius.  Much of my first summer is spent reading Pippi Longstocking and the South Seas over and over again.

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7 comments

  1. Awww…Abby, you sound like such a cute dorkey little child.


  2. These are delightful. Keep it up!
    Why didn’t we let you go up the Statue of Liberty? Were we just too cheap? It’s amazing you grew up to be so well adjusted given the stuff we put you through. On the other hand, maybe a bit of adversity was necessary for your maturity 🙂


  3. Becca – thanks hon, right back at you 🙂
    Dad – I am glad you are enjoying them and actually the reason I didn’t get to climb up is that you guys (wisely I might add) judged my 7 year old self not up for climbing the hundreds of stairs involved in reaching the top. I think what made it rather bitter for me was that you and Tim when up, but I was too young. And yes it is totally the years and years of adversity and huge obstacles that has resulted in my high level of maturity.


  4. I’m really impressed at how much you remember of all this!


  5. *ahem* “high level” of maturity?


  6. Ooh, you forgot a very important one:

    Age 8 – Displaces big brother from his position as reigning reading champion in elementary school read-a-thon when she reads six or seven thousand pages in month of February alone. Begins path towards future librarianship. Also enjoys prize of hot fudge sundae.

    And one possible correction. I think playing legos in the basement and listening to Simon and Garfunkel happened after the move to Indiana. That’s when I remember a big pile of legos on the basement floor and the record player. I don’t think the Pennsylvania place had a record player in the basement. And I also suspect mom and dad may not have allowed Simon and Garfunkel for such young ears. But of course we probably played legos in Pennsylvania too…


  7. Tim – I think you are right about the legos, plus the whole moving thing probably meant that we had even fewer childhood friends to play with 🙂 And thanks for the reminder about the read-a-thon, those were the days, sigh.



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